Sure Pinterest is Hot, but is it the Next Facebook?

Is Pinterest the next Facebook?

Fortune magazine is asking the question in their April issue, but they’re not the first one’s to consider it.

The graphically-oriented social media site is gaining popularity faster than a studio-made teen idol. People, particularly young women, are signing up in droves and if we could hear them, they’d probably be shrieking with joy.

Here are a few comments from Twitter:

people ask me how I know @pinterest is here to stay…I think – I’m having a bad night and Ill want to do is go pin/look at pins

Wife occupied for hours while I watch basketball. Thank you Pinterest…whatever you are.

And not complementary but says it:

It’s not until you click into the “Popular” section that you glimpse the Winnie The Pooh sweatshirt-wearing nightmare that is @pinterest.

Pinterest is the internet version of a box of chocolates. Got that. But is it powerful enough to become the next Facebook?

Look at these numbers from comScore:

Pinterest is rising fast, but popularity comes with a set of unique problems. One is capacity. Keeping the servers up during a sudden, unexpected traffic deluge can be tricky. People will only stand for so many outages before they say good-bye.

Next, there are the legal issues. Pinterests entire business is based on people posting photos they don’t own. It’s not a photo hosting site like Flickr. It’s a virtual scrapbook and some content owners don’t like it.

Mostly, there’s the novelty factor. Right now, Pinterest is a fun, new place to play. It doesn’t take much effort to pin a photo and even less to repin. Tumblr has a similar system, but their site is still more about photo-blogging. Pinterest is more like taking a stroll through a museum.

There are no games. There are no rewards. There’s limited text space and it’s not really informative. As much as I dislike Facebook, I learn something about somebody every time I visit. When I visit Pinterest, I get overwhelmed by the clutter.  It’s hoarder heaven.

I’m sure the site will grow and change with time. Eventually, the rise in traffic will cease and as with all social media sites, it will have a loyal core audience sitting on top of 1,000′s of abandoned accounts.

Will Pinterest become the next Facebook? I say the next Twitter but Facebook has nothing to worry about.

Do you pin?

Marketing Pilgrim’s Social Channel is proudly sponsored by Full Sail University, where you can earn your Masters of Science Degree in Internet Marketing in less than 2 years. Visit FullSail.edu for more information.

B2B Marketers’ Social Media Efforts Have Much Room to Mature

Let’s just start by saying that the B2C approach vs. the B2B approach to social media marketing is often at opposite ends of the spectrum. Not always but often. Honestly, it should be. Asking you friends about an electronics purchase or the best place to find shoes is an inherently different mindset that finding the right multi-million dollar software and hardware combination for a business. In other words, there aren’t a lot of OMG’s in the B2B social media space (Thank God!).

Recent findings back this idea. eMarketer shows some research conducted in November of 2011 by Pardot that indicates where B2B marketers are spending their social media time.

As you can see, LinkedIn leads the way while good old blogging comes in second with both being well ahead of Twitter and Facebook. This makes sense since business related interactions aren’t nearly as warm and fuzzy as personal interactions. That’s not to say that there are no personal relationships in business. Heck, most sales happen as a result of the personal relationship developed between seller and prospect. When it comes to getting hard core data and information, however, there is less collaboration and more investigation in the B2B space.

Another interesting thing of note comes from research performed by BtoB Magazine. Their findings show that there is plenty of room for growth with regard to how marketers see their social media efforts. Of course, the agencies serving these companies look a bit different but they should.

With 75% of the B2B marketers being in either the early stages of social media or not using it at all this could be the most promising sector of all for social media. It certainly should be an area for serious consideration for those who are consulting on social media marketing.

So why the lag behind the B2C space? It’s the same as it was with the adoption of search marketing by B2B marketers. There are established ways of doing business in the B2B space that can continue on somewhat uninterrupted even in the Internet age. B2B marketers are not leading or bleeding edge types in most cases because their customers aren’t either. There’s nothing wrong with that. It just is what it is.

So rather than whine that B2B marketers don’t get it etc., etc. it might be better to think that they get more than many people think. After all, they have decided that much of hype around social media hasn’t warranted an all out abandonment of things that still work. In fact, one might argue that the slower adoption rate in the B2B space is the smarter way to go.

What’s your take? Is the B2B space just behind the times or is it now positioned to take advantage of social media in a significant way?

How Our 5 Challengers Are Surviving Without Social Media

Could you disconnect from social media for two weeks?

We asked Mashable readers to tell us why they would want to do just that, and after reviewing the answers we received, we chose five brave individuals to partake in the challenge. It’s been one week since those individuals temporarily severed all social media ties, so we contacted them via email to see how they are dealing with the disconnect.

So far, their experiences have generally been positive. However, there have been a few things that make life without social media difficult. Here are some of the recurring themes the came up in their responses.


Communication Has Become More Personal


Multiple participants mentioned that they’re having more one-on-one conversations with friends and family, through texts and phone calls. Andrea says, “I have some friends who have already emailed me or started texting me directly for interaction. Which I’m finding is nicer. It’s a more personal connection, which is something we should strive for with people we are friends with.”

One of our challenge participants even had a birthday celebration this past week. While he received more text and phones calls from friends and family, Javier says he probably missed out on at least 80% of his birthday wishes because he was not able to log on to Facebook. He added that it was a bit awkward to receive phone calls from people he normally only interacted with on Facebook or Twitter.


Missing Status Updates


Participants also reported that they missed not being able to post status updates, share photos or post to their blogs. Andrea wrote that she was at a Radiohead concert this past weekend, but wasn’t able upload a photo that she was especially proud of. Vincent also lamented being unable to check in when he was flying across the country this past week — looks like he missed out on valuable Foursquare points.


Social Media Is Everywhere


The disconnect challenge has made participants realize just how much social media is integrated into almost everything online. Jaime writes, “I’m struck by how much social media permeates almost everything I do online.” When she went to read an article on a news site, she noticed that there were comments and share links for every article she read.


Will People Forget About Me?


Not using social media has made communication more personal, but many challenge participants reported the fear that their acquaintances and contacts would forget about them. Natalia even worried that readers of her blog would stop following because she wouldn’t be posting content for two weeks. She says, “It’s quite crazy how you can ‘exist’ without actually seeing people in person. It’s like social media created a space between reality and fiction.”

Vincent describes his experience with the challenge so far. “I think it’s a pretty exciting feeling right now, knowing that no one knows where I am or what I’m doing,” he says. I feel like I have much more privacy and freedom than before. I would almost recommend that everyone try this at some point.”

It’s only been a week into the challenge, and the participants have another week to go. We are interested to see how the habits of the participants change, or don’t change. Will their views on the use of social media in their everyday lives change? Check back next week for another recap of the challenge participants experiences.

Do you have any predictions for our challenge participants next week?


Comment


http://joshaersocialmediasolutions.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/7b3af_javier-edit2.jpg

Javier is a young digital journalist and community manager, among other things. He wants to disconnect for two weeks to discover how he’ll share his ideas and opinions with out social media.

Javier’s Facebook Profile

Javier’s Twitter Profile


http://joshaersocialmediasolutions.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/7b3af_andrea-edit2.jpg

Andrea is a hobbyist photographer who uses social media when she first wakes up in the morning and before she goes to bed. She wants to take the two-week challenge to see what kinds of things she’ll get done without social media.

Andrea’s Twitter Profile

Andrea’s Facebook Profile


http://joshaersocialmediasolutions.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/7b3af_vincent-edit.jpg

Vincent is a young filmmaker and marketer who uses social media for both promotional and personal uses. He sees this two-week experiment as a productive challenge.

Vincent’s Facebook Profile


http://joshaersocialmediasolutions.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/7b3af_natalia2-edit.jpg

Natalia wants to partake in this two-week challenge in order to to find inspiration in the offline world to use for her blog.

Natalia’s Facebook profile

Natalia’s Blog


http://joshaersocialmediasolutions.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/7b3af_jaime2-edit.jpg

Jaime is a stay-at-home mom who uses social media every day to stay connected with her friends. She wants to take the two-week challenge to see how productive she can be and how difficult life can be without social media.

Jaime’s Twitter Profile

Jaime’s Blog

View As One Page »

View As Slideshow »

Javier is a young digital journalist and community manager, among other things. He wants to disconnect for two weeks to discover how he’ll share his ideas and opinions with out social media.

Javier’s Facebook Profile

Javier’s Twitter Profile


Andrea is a hobbyist photographer who uses social media when she first wakes up in the morning and before she goes to bed. She wants to take the two-week challenge to see what kinds of things she’ll get done without social media.

Andrea’s Twitter Profile

Andrea’s Facebook Profile


Vincent is a young filmmaker and marketer who uses social media for both promotional and personal uses. He sees this two-week experiment as a productive challenge.

Vincent’s Facebook Profile


Natalia wants to partake in this two-week challenge in order to to find inspiration in the offline world to use for her blog.

Natalia’s Facebook profile

Natalia’s Blog


Jaime is a stay-at-home mom who uses social media every day to stay connected with her friends. She wants to take the two-week challenge to see how productive she can be and how difficult life can be without social media.

Jaime’s Twitter Profile

Jaime’s Blog


Social Media Supports ‘Hunger Games’ More Than ‘Potter,’ Less Than ‘Twilight’ [CHARTS]

Social media users are more positive about the upcoming Hunger Games movie than they were about the final installment of Harry Potter, but not quite as stoked as they were for the first Twilight: Breaking Dawn film.

The Hunger Games, set for release this weekend, is the latest fantasy-oriented picture to feature a teenage or pre-teen protagonist, so it’s interesting to compare its buzz on social media with the two most recent similar blockbusters. The first of two Twilight: Breaking Dawn films was released last November, while Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 debuted in July.

Mashable tapped social media analysis company Fizziology to look at sentiment on Twitter, Facebook and blogs for the Hunger Games. Here are highlights of their findings:

  • Nearly twice as much of the coversation on social media has revolved around buying tickets early for The Hunger Games than was the case for Twilight, at 7% to 4%. But that’s still a good 2% less of a role than than getting tickets played in the Harry Potter conversation.
  • 4% of social media buzz for The Hunger Games talks about seeing midnight shows. That’s good for a tie with Harry Potter, and double what the rate was for Twilight
  • Social media sentiment for all three films is and was overwhelmingly positive, but Twilight engendered the most negative talk, at 7% of all conversation. The Hunger Games comes in at 3%, while just 1% of conversation surrounding Harry Potter was negative.

Check out the Fizziology graphic below for a full picture of how social media sentiment for The Hunger Games stacks up against Twilight and Harry Potter. Do these findings match what you’ve been seeing in your social feeds? Let us know in the comments.

Twitter Expands the Boundaries for Promoted Tweets

Every couple of months, Twitter inches slightly closer to their goal of becoming an advertising force in social media.

This week’s action was pushing Promoted Tweets out to the mobile apps. More importantly, they expanded who sees the ads and that’s great for marketers.

Previously, Promoted Tweets only showed up in your stream if you followed that brand. Now, advertisers can choose to show Tweets to anyone with similar interests.

The way I interpret this is, if I’m following Coca-Cola on Twitter, then Pepsi can choose to send me their Promoted Tweets.

Twitter says they decided to make this move because the response they got to their mobile testing was positive. Will it stay that way?

It does seem that people have stopped carrying on about the presence of advertising. Perhaps they’ve finally realized that it’s not only necessary if they want the app for free, but it can be helpful.

Yes, I said it. Advertising is a good thing. I know I’m preaching to the choir here, but perhaps my word will spread to the masses and people will learn to embrace ads, not run from them.

Twitter says 55% of the more than 100 million regular users check in at least once a month using a mobile app. With the upgrades in navigation and presentation, this number should continue to climb.

I had a real love affair with Twitter at the start, then broke away for several months. Now, I’ve found I really enjoy sitting on the couch, flipping through the day’s tweets with my iPad. The app allows me to easily click through to read submitted articles and I feel like I’m getting more out of Twitter than ever before.

How about you? Do you use Twitter on mobile? How does it fit in to your marketing plan?

Marketing Pilgrim’s Social Channel is proudly sponsored by Full Sail University, where you can earn your Masters of Science Degree in Internet Marketing in less than 2 years. Visit FullSail.edu for more information.