Facebook Ad Engagement: The Problem With “Too Much”

Facebook Ad Engagement

Is it possible to get “too much” Facebook ad engagement? I started asking that when ads that got great engagement received a high percentage of organic distribution.

I know, the question sounds ridiculous. Especially since Facebook marketers are notorious for complaining about their lack of organic reach on posts that weren’t ads.

But we never talk about organic distribution of ads. And we never talk about the problems that can result from that distribution to people who weren’t intended to see them.

The truth is that the paid results Facebook reports only make up a part of the story. And if you have a particularly strong ad, Facebook may be leaving out quite a bit of information that helps you measure the success of that ad.

This became especially evident in an experiment I’m running right now. That organic distribution can actually cause problems and confusion when people see “ads” they aren’t supposed to see — because they aren’t actually ads at that moment due to the engagement by a connection.


Is it possible for a Facebook ad to get ‘too much’ engagement? Let’s take a look…
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My Experiment

I started an experiment recently using Facebook ads. It began with the following organic post…

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

I’m performing a little experiment. Would you like to participate?>> CLICK ON THE IMAGE THAT APPLIES TO YOU AS A…

Posted by Jon Loomer Digital on Friday, March 25, 2016

I also promoted this to my fans. I then created another version as an ad only and targeted my website visitors. This isn’t important since my focus won’t be on those ads, but the background is necessary.

The concept is this: I want people to segment themselves by clicking on one of the images within a carousel ad indicating whether they are an advanced, intermediate or beginner Facebook advertiser. I will then show them promoted content catered to them as such.

I’ll get into the details regarding how this is done at another time. But the primary way this works is with Website Custom Audiences.

Once a person clicks on the “Advanced” image, for example, they immediately fall into a 30-day campaign. That campaign starts with a video that will be shown to them for the first three days, welcoming them. After that, I ask them to complete a quiz to get a better idea of their “advanced” level.

From there, I will show them content during the final three weeks or so that I think will matter most to them. After those 30 days, they fall out of the campaign. This is an example of an evergreen campaign — you may have heard me talk about the concept before.

Again, I don’t want to go into all of the details of the campaign right now. But the background was necessary.

The main takeaway is that people are engaging with this content at a very high rate, and it’s led to some unexpected consequences.

Example: What Facebook Reports

As I mentioned above, if you clicked the “Advanced” image link within the first campaign, you’d be added to a series of Website Custom Audiences for advanced Facebook advertisers. That would be the primary source of my targeting for the advanced group.

The first ad these people would see after clicking the “Advanced” image is a video. Here is a recap of some of the primary metrics for that ad in my ad reports…

Facebook Ad Video Report

At first glance, it’s really not that impressive. Getting $.05 per video view is nothing to write home about. However, keep in mind that the CPM is pretty high at over $15. A big reason for this is that I bid extremely high to make sure I reach as many of the people in the audience as possible.

Anyway, that’s again a discussion for another day.

The primary thing to see here is that if we look only at the ad reports, this video reached 2,175 people and got 2,378 video views (some people watched it multiple times!). Immediately, that over 1:1 ratio is fantastic engagement.

Example: Actual Distribution

What we often forget, though, is that this is Facebook reporting on paid reach and video views only. It does not consider organic reach and video views.

Finding that organic distribution isn’t particularly easy, either. Since this video exists only as an ad, it’s not as if I can go to my page or even my page Insights to find it. Instead, I need to find the permalink for the ad — this is where I’m directed when I get a notification about a new comment on the ad.

Facebook Video Organic Paid

Do you see what I see?

My ad reports tell me that the ad reached 2,175 people. In reality, it reached 17,402 people. It’s not that the ad report was lying. It was only reporting on paid reach.

So Facebook was only reporting on 12.5% of the reach in the ad reports. While the ad was only published as an ad (never published to my page), nearly 88% of the audience ended up being organic.

That also means we could alter our evaluation of this ad. While the ad reports told us there were 2,378 video views, there have actually been approximately 5,600. So in reality, my cost per video view is actually closer to $.02.

Sure, the people I targeted engaged with the video at a far higher rate than those who engaged organically (109% vs. 21%). That should also be expected — it means I targeted well! But we shouldn’t ignore that organic engagement either.

The “Problem”

Normally, I wouldn’t be all that concerned that about 88% of the reach on an ad is organic. It tells me that the ad is performing well!

But in this case, it presents problems. Maybe they are problems that aren’t typical to a campaign, but the problem highlights what can happen when an ad gets “too much” engagement.

While the comments on that ad are overwhelmingly positive, here’s a sampling of the not-so-positive response…

Facebook Ad Comments Organic

Note that I’m excluding people once they’ve watched at least 50% of the video (I use Engagement on Facebook Custom Audiences to do that). So the first person may have simply failed to watch 50% of the video.

But the second is a clear case of someone who was very likely seeing the “ad” organically. They didn’t click the “Advanced” image, they clicked “Intermediate.” And while they had been served the intermediate video as well, they were now seeing the advanced one — and they aren’t supposed to!

Again, normally, this isn’t a problem. But this experiment is a perfect storm for it to become an issue:

  • My audience is savvy
  • My audience wants to see my ads
  • My audience will pay close attention to what they see and why
  • My audience will be quick to point out “bad targeting”

If the purpose of this campaign was to sell sleeping bags, no one would care — or probably notice. But the organic distribution will lead to people seeing an ad that I had intended for someone else.

How I’m Combatting It

The ad with the biggest issue with organic distribution wasn’t even the ad with the highest percentage of organic distribution. It was that first organic post that was published to my fans and then promoted to my fans.

The organic distribution of that post is about 62%. But I have a long list of comments on it from people who think they shouldn’t be seeing it.

There are many explanations for why someone might be seeing that ad when they think they shouldn’t be. But while users are quick to blame either the advertiser or Facebook, the reality is that neither are normally at fault. It’s often due to one of the following:

  • Organic distribution (as described above)
  • Page with the pixel didn’t complete loading
  • Device, browser or privacy settings prevented Facebook from adding them to an audience

Particularly on that primary ad, I had replied to countless people about this, and it was beginning to get exhausting.

How do you solve this “problem”? On one hand, the best solution would be that no one ever commented, liked or shared the ads. That would keep distribution to precisely the people I targeted. But that wouldn’t happen, and that’s a pretty silly solution.

Instead, I’m now creating ads as a carousel — I promote the primary link as the focus of the ad, but the second image links to a page where I explain Why You Might Be Seeing an Ad When You Think You Shouldn’t Be (feel free to read it if you’re interested!).

Facebook Ad Carousel Why Am I Seeing This

What you don’t see in the ad above is that in the final bit of copy I include this message:

Finally, it’s possible you’re seeing this right now when you think you shouldn’t be. I always get those comments below! I added the “Why You Might Be Seeing An Ad You Think You Shouldn’t Be” post below to help answer that question.

That seems to have helped!

Your Turn

While this may be an extreme example, this is something we need to consider. I’ll often hear from people who are upset that they have comments from people in countries they were not targeting in their ad (or some other characteristic), but this is precisely how it happens.

What do you think? Have you ever seen organic distribution of ads cause problems?

Let me know in the comments below!

The post Facebook Ad Engagement: The Problem With “Too Much” appeared first on Jon Loomer Digital.

Facebook Ad Engagement: The Problem With “Too Much”
Source: Great Facebook Feeds From Around The Web

How to Build a Peer Network to Increase Your Social Reach

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Does the content you share get the reach it needs? Want to learn how to get your content seen by more people? A network of social advocates will help you amplify the reach of the content you share. In this article you’ll discover how to build a network of peers and fans that will help […]

This post How to Build a Peer Network to Increase Your Social Reach first appeared on .
– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

How to Build a Peer Network to Increase Your Social Reach
Source: Great Social Media Feeds From Around The Web 1

LinkedIn Profile Examples: How To Create A Professional & Client Focused Profile

LinkedIn Profile Examples: How To Create A Professional & Client Focused ProfileHave you wondered what to put into your LinkedIn profile? Perhaps it should read like your professional CV or bio? If you are looking for a job that approach may work.

However, if you are looking to use LinkedIn as a powerful business building tool, you’ll need to take a different approach.

But what exactly to write in your profile may have you stumped. In this article I will share several LinkedIn profile examples to help you learn how you can improve your profile.

In this article you will find a diverse list of professional, client focused profiles that you can learn from, to help you improve your own – because just having a LinkedIn profile is no longer enough.

With over 414,000,000 LinkedIn members, there is a very good chance your ideal clients will never find you or click on your profile unless you take some very proactive steps to ensure that your own profile is complete, well written and focused on your ideal clients.

LinkedIn has over 414,000,000 registered members.

LinkedIn has over 414,000,000 registered members.

While there is no exact recipe that will be equally successful or work exactly the same for everyone, there are some key areas you should focus on and formulas that you can use.

Here are variety of different LinkedIn profile examples of each important section, to help you clearly understand how to create a profile that is complete, professional looking and speaks to your ideal clients.

Successful LinkedIn Profile Examples

LinkedIn Headline, Profile Image & Cover Photo

Your profile image and headline are the very first impression that someone will get when they find you on LinkedIn. They will decide within seconds whether they want to learn more about you, or move on to the next person.

Remember, this is LinkedIn (not Twitter or Facebook) and the impression you give must be a professional one. It must speak to what you do and your credibility.

Profile Image

With this in mind, you need to ensure that your profile image will convey the impression that you want it to give.

LinkedIn profile examples of a professional profile photo.

A LinkedIn profile example of a professional profile photo.

 Headline

Your headline is the MOST important part of your LinkedIn profile. You have 120 characters to make them want to learn more about you.

Using one or two of your main keywords, create a headline that will generate interest and help your connections to know they are in the right place.

LinkedIn profile examples of a well written headline that generates interest and includes main keywords.

A LinkedIn profile example of a well written headline that generates interest and includes main keywords.

Cover Image

Both free and premium accounts can add a personalized cover image. Using this prime visual space at the top of your profile will help you stand out and showcase your business.

Stand out and showcase your business by adding a cover photo to your LinkedIn profile.

Stand out and showcase your business by adding a cover photo to your LinkedIn profile.

 

Premium LinkedIn accounts do not have ads covering any of the cover photo.

Premium LinkedIn accounts do not have ads covering any of the cover photo.

Here is a wide range of LinkedIn profile examples featuring the top region the the personal profile that you can use to help you make a positive first impression with potential connections.

This financial services headline speaks directly to the ideal clients and what benefits they can expect.

This financial services headline speaks directly to the ideal clients and what benefits they can expect.

This recruiting headline mixes keywords and benefits.

This recruiting headline mixes keywords and benefits.

This travel related headline generate interest and includes main keywords.

This travel related headline generate interest and includes main keywords.

This photography headline speaks to a very specific group of ideal clients.

This photography headline speaks to a very specific group of ideal clients.

This technology coach headline speaks to the benefits as well as including main keywords.

This technology coach headline speaks to the benefits as well as including main keywords.

This law related headline focuses on identifying its ideal clients

This law related headline focuses on identifying its ideal clients

LinkedIn Publisher Posts

Not only a great way to increase your authority on your topic, LinkedIn Publisher posts also benefit your personal profile visually, as your last three Publisher posts are displayed on your profile. These posts are located just below your headline and profile photo.

To ensure your posts display optimally on your profile, include a custom cover image (700 X 400 pixels).

Here are a number of LinkedIn profile examples with Publisher posts.

In the first couple of examples you can see that the posts have a custom graphic.

In this LinkedIn profile example, all three LinkedIn Publisher posts include a professional, custom made graphic.

In this LinkedIn profile example, all three LinkedIn Publisher posts include a professional, custom made graphic.

 

The custom graphics used in these posts are meant to catch your attention and make you click through to the post.

The custom graphics used in these posts are meant to catch your attention and make you click through to the post.

 

The custom cover image graphics add color to the profile to help catch your eye.

The custom cover image graphics add color to the profile to help catch your eye.

If you can’t afford to have a custom graphic made or don’t have the skills to make one yourself, you can always use images and stock photography.

Each cover image relates in some way to the topic of the post.

Each cover image relates in some way to the topic of the post.

The cover images vary depending on the topic and purpose of the post.

The cover images vary depending on the topic and purpose of the post.

These cover images are a mix of custom graphics and photos.

These cover images are a mix of custom graphics and photos.

LinkedIn Summary

After you have convinced a potential connection to click through to your profile, your summary is the first thing they will read to learn more about you and what you offer.

While a potential connection will read this section to learn more about you – what they really want to know more about is how you can help them.

Do NOT make your summary all about you or written like a resume. Your LinkedIn summary should:

  • be client-focused
  • speak directly to your target market
  • be written in first person
  • include your chosen keywords
  • be up to 2000 characters in length
  • include rich media such as pdfs, videos or SlideShare presentations

You must make sure your potential connections know they’re in the right place and that you are the person who can help them with their specific problems

Below are a number of LinkedIn profile examples that use my three-part summary formula to make a compelling and client-focused summary section.

  1. Credibility Section
  2. Ideal Clients—Their Problem—Your Solution
  3. Call to Action

Learn more about creating an effective summary.

A LinkedIn profile example that clearly explains who my ideal clients are and includes rich media.

A LinkedIn profile example that clearly explains who my ideal clients are and includes rich media.

 

This summary explains who his ideal clients are how he can help them.

This summary explains who his ideal clients are how he can help them.

 

Executives and business owners in need of a private investigator can clearly identify themselves and see what kinds of challenges he can solve for them.

Executives and business owners in need of a private investigator can clearly identify themselves and see what kinds of challenges he can solve for them.

 

Ideal clients with project management issues can self-select while reading this summary.

Ideal clients with project management issues can self-select while reading this summary.

 

Ideal clients will feel more confident seeing the depth of her experience and the very well know companies she has helped.

Ideal clients will feel more confident seeing the depth of her experience and the very well know companies she has helped.

 

People in healthcare looking for an affordable, portable ultrasound option can quickly identify themselves after reading the summary.

People in healthcare looking for an affordable, portable ultrasound option can quickly identify themselves after reading the summary.

LinkedIn Current Experience

While your inclination might be to focus on your experience in this section, this is actually another great place for you to really speak to your ideal clients and explain why they are in the right place to overcome their challenges.

Current Experience

The formula for writing your current work experience is similar to that of your summary, with a few key differences.

Be sure to use as many of the available 2000 characters as possible and include your keywords in both the title and description. Also add rich media and recommendations to your experience section.

The formula for writing a client focused current experience section include:

  1. Credibility Section
  2. Service/Products List
  3. Who You Work With or Well Know Clients List
  4. Exceptional Testimonial (Optional)
  5. Call to Action

Here are a several LinkedIn profile examples using this current experience formula.

The benefits of working with me are easily visible as are the services I offer.

The benefits of working with me are easily visible as are the services I offer.

 

Potential connections wanting to travel to the Riviera Maya will quickly spot the bright, enticing rich media found below the current work experience.

Potential connections wanting to travel to the Riviera Maya will quickly spot the bright, enticing rich media found below the current work experience.

 

The testimonial included in the experience section helps to build trust with ideal clients.

The testimonial included in the experience section helps to build trust with ideal clients.

 

In the current experience of this LinkedIn profile example, he clearly identifies the region that his company serves.

In the current experience of this LinkedIn profile example, he clearly identifies the region that his company serves.

 

Ideal clients can see a list of the services this private investigator and his company offers.

Ideal clients can see a list of the services this private investigator and his company offers.

Past Experience

Your LinkedIn profile should include at least a few of your past positions, to give it a more complete look.

The past experience section should include at least one paragraph describing what you did and any accomplishments during that time. Be sure to add keywords in the title and description.

This example shows your past work experience section does not have to be long or in-depth to convey the relevant information.

This example shows your past work experience section does not have to be long or in-depth to convey the relevant information.

Other Key LinkedIn Profile Areas

There are a number of other vital areas in your LinkedIn profile that you should update in order to ensure that your profile:

  • looks professional and complete
  • is keyword optimized
  • further establishes your credibility & authority
  • helps your ideal clients to know, like and trust you
  • tells potential connections what to do next

Publications

Publications is an excellent section to help you establish your authority on your topic.

In this section you want to include content or resources you have created which are of value to your ideal clients and showcase your expertise. These could include books, eBooks, reports, whitepapers, checklists or articles you have written.

Check out the LinkedIn profile examples below for ideas of what to include and how to add them to your own profile.

This publications section includes a variety of different types publications, all which help build authority.

This publications section includes a variety of different types publications, all which help build authority.

 

This valuable resource helps ideal clients at the early stage of their buying journey, setting her up as a trusted expert.

This valuable resource helps ideal clients at the early stage of their buying journey, setting her up as a trusted expert.

Skills & Endorsements

While the skills section does not have the same weight and credibility as the recommendations section, it will increase your level of social proof and improve your search ranking.

In this section you want to ensure that you:

  • have a minimum of 10 skills added to your profile
  • move the skills which reflect your keywords to the top of the list
  • endorse others as many will reciprocate and endorse you

In the LinkedIn profile example below you can see that the most important skills are listed at the top.

Pay special attention to the number of endorsements for each set of skills. If you were to compare this profile with someone who did the exact same thing but had much fewer endorsements, who would you be more likely to choose?

There is a subconscious acknowledgement of expertise when people see a high number of endorsements.

There is a subconscious acknowledgement of expertise when people see a high number of endorsements.

Advice For Contacting

Always make it easy for your ideal clients and potential connections to take the next step by ensuring you add your call to action (CTA) in your advice for contacting section.

Tell them what you want them to do next. This can be the same call-to-action that you have used in your summary and current experience sections.

This advice for contacting section speaks to each different set of ideal clients.

This advice for contacting section speaks to each different set of ideal clients.

 

An example of a customer service CTA.

An example of a customer service CTA.

 

An example of a travel related CTA

An example of a travel related CTA.

 

An example of a print industry related CTA.

An example of a print industry related CTA.

 

An example of a technology coaching related CTA.

An example of a technology coaching related CTA.

Recommendations

Recommendations are a vital part of establishing trust and building your authority and credibility on your profile.

There are a number of strategies that you can use to increase the number of recommendation you have received. Keep in mind that these should only be employed when the person can honestly vouch for the work you do.

Strategy 1: Provide a recommendation to your connections, as they may reciprocate. Never do this for someone who you do not know.

Strategy 2: Ask for recommendations from people you have worked with and can speak to your expertise and results. Be sure to personalize your request and provide ideas of what you would like them to write about.

Here are several LinkedIn profile examples with an ideal amount of helpful recommendations.

What kind of impression do you get when you see over a hundred recommendations?

What kind of impression do you get when you see over a hundred recommendations?

 

Recommendations from both people you have worked for and with are beneficial.

Recommendations from both people you have worked for and with are beneficial.

Wrapping Up

Your LinkedIn profile will often be your very first online impression for people wanting to learn more about you. What they find on your profile will influence not only whether they wish to connect with you, but whether they think you are someone who can help them solve their challenges.  By creating a professional, client focused LinkedIn profile, you will attract your ideal clients, help them to know they have found the right person and establish your authority on your topic.

Need help creating your professional, client focused LinkedIn profile? Sign up for a free, no-obligation LinkedIn profile session with us.

The post LinkedIn Profile Examples: How To Create A Professional & Client Focused Profile appeared first on Top Dog Social Media.


LinkedIn Profile Examples: How To Create A Professional & Client Focused Profile
Source: Great LinkedIn Feeds From Around The Web

How to Maximize Your Content Exposure on LinkedIn

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Are you taking advantage of all of LinkedIn’s content marketing features? Do you know what types of content work best on LinkedIn? With a few tweaks to what you post on LinkedIn, you can build brand awareness, generate leads, and drive more revenue. In this article you’ll discover how to maximize your LinkedIn content exposure. […]

This post How to Maximize Your Content Exposure on LinkedIn first appeared on .
– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

How to Maximize Your Content Exposure on LinkedIn
Source: Great Social Media Feeds From Around The Web 1

How to Use Trello to Manage Your Facebook Group Posts

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Are you active in Facebook groups? Looking for a better way to organize the content you share in those groups? Managing your content in Trello lets you spend less time figuring out what to share in Facebook groups and more time engaging with fellow members. In this article you’ll discover how to use Trello to […]

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– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

How to Use Trello to Manage Your Facebook Group Posts
Source: Great Social Media Feeds From Around The Web 1