Organic Listings

“So what is it that you actually do?”

Hmmm. I’ve heard that question a lot recently.

Basically, most businesses spend a lot of money on advertising in media that has been around for a long time. Strategies that they understand. Physical directories in book form or local newspapers. It’s expensive but, historically, it’s had a relatively good success rate.

Over the last few years, these traditional methods of advertising have experienced strong competition from online services which offer a similar product on the internet. Again, it’s expensive, but if someone comes round offering to provide you with your own website and the marketing to go with it, if you don’t understand computers, you bite off their arm.

However, whilst these companies can be very successful in getting your company ranked on Google, they are in it for themselves, not for your business.

This means that, in many cases, the Google juice acquired from the website that bears your name actually goes to the advertising company. The data relating to ‘your’ website is, often, either too generic to give your company any real help or actually drives the Google spiders towards their website. A lot of the time, this is because the people designing those websites don’t understand how meta data or keywords work.

Another way of advertising is to use Google Adwords. Specific keywords that relate to your business and which are given a monetary value that you agree to pay every time someone clicks on that link.

"organic-listings"So, on the Google search pages, the top two or three returns will be ‘paid’ or ‘sponsored’ links. As will all those in the right hand column. If anyone clicks on them, the companies to whom they link pay Google the agreed amount, a figure which varies depending on how high up the listing you want to be. The url at the top will have agreed to pay the most money every time that link is clicked.

The other links on the page are known as organic listings.

These are sites that the Google spiders, scouring the internet on your behalf, have decided are the best match to the terms of your search.

In days gone by, the sponsored links would get as many as 30% of any clicks on the page. However, recent data shows that only 2-3% of searchers actually click on the paid listings at the top of the page and only 1-2% for the column on the right-hand side.

Averaged out this means that if you’re spending as much money as you possibly can advertising on Google Adwords, you’re still only able to get 4-5% of the available clicks on that page.

This is because the general public are becoming more internet-savvy. We now know about the composition of the page and that the person at the top of the paid listings might not be the cheapest or, indeed, the best. More and more, we are turning to the free organic listings which are decided through popularity.

As a website owner with a site optimised for a specific keyword, you want your business to show up in the top ten results on that page.

The site at position Number One will get as many as 45% of any available clicks.

Position Number Two will receive between 11 and 18%.

7-15% of users will plump for the url situated at Position Number Three.

Sites ranking from 4th to 9th will get 2% of the clicks – equalling the performance of the best paid rankings at the top of the page but without any monetary input. That’s right, they get the same number of clicks for free.

Curiously, because people ‘scroll’ down, the site in 10th place is better placed than the six sites ranked above it, achieving 3% of the page’s interest.

So that’s what I want to achieve for my clients – front page ranking for their chosen keyword but, better still, getting them slotted into the top three or tenth spot on the free organic listings.

And, I tell you this for nothing, I’m a hell of a lot cheaper than Google Adwords.

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